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As the nation’s largest minority, Hispanics have been a point of focus in recent elections, especially given the rising importance of immigration as a policy issue. The majority of immigrants to the United States are Hispanic, so it has long been assumed that Hispanics will be most loyal to candidates that make immigration to the U.S. easier.
On this week’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy, Jim Robb of NumbersUSA joins host and executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, Mark Krikorian, to discuss voting and public opinion trends among Hispanics, particularly regarding immigration, and to debunk the longstanding myth that Hispanics want open borders.
“Hispanics, they’re not especially conservative,” Robb explains, “but they’re as conservative as other Americans are conservative.” In essence, Hispanics are increasingly voting like the rest of the U.S. population, which often happens among other immigrant groups, as they and their children assimilate to the broader American culture over time. Robb’s recent book, Political Migrants: Hispanic Voters on the Move—How America’s Largest Minority Is Flipping Conventional Wisdom on Its Head, discusses these trends in greater detail.
Mark Krikorian is the Executive Director of the Center for Immigration Studies.
Jim Robb is Vice President of NumbersUSA.
Book: Political Migrants: Hispanic Voters on the Move—How America’s Largest Minority Is Flipping Conventional Wisdom on Its Head
The Chattering Class on Hispanic Voters
DeSantis’ Anti-Illegal Immigration Stance Not an Impediment in Hispanic-Heavy Florida
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Voices in the opening montage:

The Center for Immigration Studies is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit research organization founded in 1985. It is the nation’s only think tank devoted exclusively to research and policy analysis of the economic, social, demographic, fiscal, and other impacts of immigration on the United States.

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